February 21, 2018

“The Post” Exceeds Expectations with a Star-Studded Cast

“The Post” showcases some of Spielberg’s most outstanding work through an accurate re-telling of one of America’s largest journalistic expositions, a compelling portrayal of characters, and stunning cinematography.

By Noah Jamani

Staff Writer

 

Director Steven Spielberg’s, “The Post” is an exhilarating historical drama that resonates in today’s complicated era of an antagonistic presidential administration. Spielberg’s incorporation of feminist momentos makes the film especially relatable with modern conflicts.

“The Post” incorporates humor into the politically charged drama and leaves audiences wanting more. The film’s visual details, star-studded cast, and the entertaining storyline keeps the audience on the edge of their seats.

Produced by 20th Century Fox, the film is based on a true story, and stars the three-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep as Katharine Graham, and two-time Oscar winner Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee, and includes a host of other well-known actors.

Set in 1971 in Washington, D.C, “The Post” depicts the true story of how the Washington Post published the Pentagon Papers. The Post published these top-secret documents regarding the involvement of the United States government in the Vietnam war, contrary to the advice from their advisors.

The film features a talented cast, and the passion of the actors shines through in their tremendous performances. In a predominantly male-dominated profession, Meryl Streep delivers an outstanding performance as the Post’s publisher, Katharine Graham. From the start of the film, the audience draws their attention towards Graham due to her hesitations and nervous nuances. Tom Hanks plays Ben Bradlee, editor of the Post, and like Streep, Hank fits his role perfectly. Bradlee is relentless and charismatic, fighting hard for the stories he believes in.

“The Post” is a story about finding the truth about a corruptive government and about the need to respect the First Amendment and the right of freedom of the press. The film also relates to the popular #MeToo movement through its portrayal of a culture that undermines women. Men are persistently hovering over Streep and speaking for her, and her character is the only woman in her profession of predominantly men. At first, Streep is cautious and hesitant, but as the movie progresses, she learns to hold her own.

The visual details and flashbacks in the film solidify “The Post” as an Oscar-contending movie. The story takes us from Vietnam to New York City and finally to Washington, D.C. From the war in Vietnam to the newsroom in Washington, the film does justice by making the setting very realistic.

The movie concludes with footage of Nixon addressing the Pentagon Papers. The footage provides viewers with a sense of realism to Spielberg’s film and reminds the audience that events that have taken place in the movie occurred. After the Washington Post publishes the Pentagon Papers, Nixon tells his press secretary that “no Washington Post reporter is allowed in the White House.” Fast forward to today — this brings to mind a vision of Trump regularly lashing out at the press, and even barring the Washington Post from covering his campaign events.

“The Post” is a riveting and entertaining story with many layers depicting just how complicated a time it was. Although the story took place in 1971, it is a story that relates to current events. It is uncanny how very much “The Post” parallels today with an administration that blames “fake news” for the world’s problems and a culture that still undermines women. Time has passed but “The Post” sheds light on the fact that nothing much has changed.

“The Post” showcases some of Spielberg’s most outstanding work through an accurate re-telling of one of America’s largest journalistic expositions, a compelling portrayal of characters, and stunning cinematography. The film proves to be the journalism movie that the modern world needs today.

“The Post” is rated PG 13, and is playing in theaters nationwide.

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